Welcome to the Council on Christian Approaches to Defence and Disarmament (“CCADD”)

Christians, like others, have long held widely differing views on the use of military force.   Many believe that the use, or threat, of military force has played a necessary part in the search for peace and justice.

Others hold that military force is contrary to the gospel message of non-violence.  But both pacifists and defenders of ‘just war’ are agreed on the need to search for means to reduce international tension.  Because CCADD does not prescribe a single approach, scholars, officials, military personnel, clergy (including chaplains to the forces), peace-movement supporters, and interested members of other faiths or none, can enter into dialogue with each other.

CCADD provides a forum for debate and channels for dissemination of ideas and knowledge, and offers the chance to talk to well-informed people on many key areas of conflict or related matters.

Terms of Membership

Membership is open to all able to conform to CCADD’s ethos of scholarship, courtesy and intellectual rigour within a framework that accepts that Christianity has a voice in contemporary debates over security. CCADD is not a platform for lobbying. It invites engagement from those interested in the practical application of ethics in the fields of defence and disarmament including all who work or have worked in different capacities in government, in academia and higher education, in the armed forces, in international organisations and in religious and secular contexts in the fields of defence and/or disarmament. CCADD therefore welcomes especially, but not exclusively, voices of experience at all levels of decision-making as members, guest speakers and in publications.  Despite varied personal ethical positions, CCADD members are united by the desire for peace and security for this and future generations, recognising that the building blocks for peace require continuing effort to identify, understand and assemble.

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PRIVACY POLICY

Some reflections on the death of Prince Philip – Major General Tim Cross, CBE